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20200864 Ballston Ave Townhomes SHPO Review ������� ��� ���������� ������� � � �����T�����. ��. ������"�� �'�'��'������� ANDREW M.CUOMO ROSE HARVEY Governor Commissioner December 20, 2018 Ms. Ki rsten Dymond Assistant Archaeologist Curtin Archaeological Consulting Inc 61 Rowland Street Ballston Spa, NY 12020 Re: DEC Ballston Avenue Townhouses Finely St & Ballston Ave, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county, NY 18 P R08059 Dear Ms. Dymond: Thank you for requesting the comments of the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP). We have reviewed the project in accordance with the New York State Historic Preservation Act of 1980 (Section 14.09 of the New York Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Law). These comments are those of the OPRHP and relate only to Historic/Cultural resources. They do not include potential environmental impacts to New York State Parkland that may be involved in or near your project. Such impacts must be considered as part of the environmental review of the project pursuant to the State Environmental Quality Review Act (New York Environmental Conservation Law Article 8) and its implementing regulations (6 NYCRR Part 617). Based upon this review, it is the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation's opinion that your project will have no impact on archaeological and/or historic resources listed in or eligible for the New York State and National Registers of Historic Places. If further correspondence is required regarding this project, please be sure to refer to the OPRHP Project Review (PR) number noted above. Sincerely, -.� � .. � Michael F. Lynch, P.E., AIA Director, Division for Historic Preservation Division for Historic Preservation P.O.Box 189,Waterford, New York 12188-0189•(518)237-8643�www.nysparks.com PHASE 1 ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY BALLSTON AVENUE TOWNHOUSES 96-1'I 6 BAL LSTO N AVE N U E CITY OF SARATOGA SPRINGS SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK Prepared for Ballston Avenue Partners, LLC 96 Ballston Avenue Saratoga Springs, New York 12866 Prepared by Curtin Archaeological Consulting, Inc. 61 Rowland Street Ballston Spa, New York 12020 Report Authors: Edward V. Curtin, Ph.D. Kirsten Dymond, B.A. Decem ber 2018 MANAGEMENT SUMMARY SHPO Project Review Number: Involved State and Federal Agencies: DEC Phase of Survey: Phase 1 Location Information Location: 96-116 Ballston Avenue Minor Civil Division: Saratoga Springs County: Saratoga Survey Area Length: 110 m (361 ft) Width: 96 m (315 ft) Number of Acres Surveyed: 1.4 a (.56 ha) USGS 7.5 Minute Quadrangle Map: Saratoga Springs Archaeological Survey Overview Number and Interval of Shovel Tests: 23 @ 7.5-15 meters Number and Size of Units: n/a Width of Plowed Strips: n/a Surface Survey Transect Interval: n/a Results of Archaeological Survey Number and Name of Prehistoric Sites: 0 Number and Name of Historic Sites: 0 Number and Name of Sites Recommended for Phase II/Avoidance: 0 Results of Architectural Survey Number of buildings/structures/cemeteries within Project Area: 0 Number of buildings/structures/cemeteries adjacent to Project Area: 0 Number of previously determined NR Listed or Eligible bu i Id i ngs/structu res/cemeteries/d istricts: 0 Report Authors: Edward V. Curtin, Ph.D. and Kirsten Dymond, B.A. Report Date: December 2018 i TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................................................1 Project Location and Description.............................................................................................. 1 Scopeof Work.......................................................................................................................... 1 ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING..........................................................................................................1 SITEFILES RESEARCH..................................................................................................................2 NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES.............................................................................3 PREVIOUS ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH ...............................................................................3 HISTORIC MAP RESEARCH...........................................................................................................3 MAP DOCUMENTED STRUCTURES.............................................................................................4 PRIORDISTURBANCE ...................................................................................................................4 ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY.................................................................................................5 PHASE 1A SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS.....................................................................5 PHASE 1 B ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD INVESTIGATIONS...........................................................5 PHASE 1 B ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY RESULTS....................................................................5 ShovelTesting.......................................................................................................................... 5 SoilStratigraphy....................................................................................................................... 6 Artifacts..................................................................................................................................... 6 PHASE 1B FIELD SURVEYSUMMARYAND RECOMMENDATION.............................................7 REFERENCES.................................................................................................................................8 APPENDIXA: FIGURES..................................................................................................................9 APPENDIX B: PHOTOS.................................................................................................................24 APPENDIX C: SHOVEL TEST PIT RECORD................................................................................30 APPENDIX D: ARTIFACT CATALOG............................................................................................33 ii INTRODUCTION Project Location and Description Ballston Avenue Partners, LLC has retained Curtin Archaeological Consulting, Inc. to conduct a Phase 1 archaeological survey of the proposed Ballston Avenue Townhouses project site at 96-116 Ballston Avenue in the City of Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, New York. The purpose of this Phase 1 archaeological survey is to evaluate the archaeological sensitivity of the Area of Potential Effect(APE) and identify whether it contains any archaeological sites. The general location of the survey is shown in Figure 1. The APE is shown in Figures 2-14. The report content and format are responsive to the standards adopted by the New York Archaeological Council (NYAC 1994) and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation (OPRHP), which contains the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). SHPO issued written guidance in 2005. Scope of Work The purpose of the Phase 1 archaeological survey is to identify the presence or absence of archaeological sites within the APE. The scope of work for this undertaking includes: (1) assessment of the environmental setting and visible indications of prior disturbance; (2) compilation and interpretation of background information including a site file search and map research; (3) appropriate archaeological fieldwork; and (4) a report of findings with recommendations. ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING The project area is located in the City of Saratoga Springs within a partly commercial, partly residential area. The most dominant environmental feature in the area is Geyser Brook located to the west across a broad sandy plain with low relief. The topography on site is level to gently sloping with a general elevation slightly above and below 320 ft above mean sea level. The project site stands out as a low knoll in the otherwise nearly featureless, generally level terrain that surrounds it(Figure 2). This knoll as mapped in the 1960s is shown extending to or slightly beyond the limits of the APE. It no longer does (as several photos in this report illustrate) because various street, building, and parking lot construction projects have removed parts of it. The core of the knoll is a wooded area in the central part of the APE. A more substantial hill is located to the east in the vicinity of Greenridge Cemetery, while the terrain to the west is marked by large depressions which have the general appearance on Figure 2 of sand borrow-pits. Table 1: Soil Descri tion for USDA 1992 Soil Surve , Sarato a Count , New York Name Soil Horizon Depth Color Texture Slope Drainage Landform (symbol) cm(in) % 0-5(0-2) decomposed pine needles glacial Windsor 5-28 (2-11) vy dk gy br lo sa outwash loamy sand 28-53(11-21) ye br lo sa 0-3 excessively plains, (WnA) 53-63(21-25) ye br sa drained kames and 63-180(25-72) It ye br sa terraces Key: vy=very; dk=dark; It=light; gy=grey; ye=yellow; br=brown; lo=loam; sa=sand Table 1 shows the soil type mapped within the APE and surrounding area. The soil within the APE is mapped as excessively drained Windsor loamy sand with 0-3% slopes. This soil is formed on glacial outwash plains, kames, and terraces. The spatial distribution of the soils is shown in Figure 3. The project location falls within the Oak-Northern Hardwood vegetation zone, a zone which is described primarily as a transition zone where oaks and northern hardwood species 1 alternate or intermingle, particularly on the moister and deeper soils along the Hudson Valley (De Laubenfels 1977). This suggests that the precontact forested landscape of the project parcel would have been covered primarily with beech and sugar maple species, with considerable oaks, as well as associated ash, basswood, cherry, birch and white pine. SITE FILES RESEARCH The archaeological site files of the New York State Museum (NYSM) and OPRHP, both maintained at OPRHP, were reviewed to identify whether archaeological resources have been reported previously within or adjacent to the project boundaries. Table 2 lists the sites identified within a one-mile radius, along with their distances to the current APE. Table 2: Previousl Recorded Archaeolo ical Sites in the New York State Site Invento NYSOPRHP Site Additional Site# Distance to APE Time Period Site Type NR # m(ft) 09140.001512 Lake Avenue 1,367(4,485) Mid 19 C. Historic Eligible Gasholder 09140.000338 Congress Spring 859(2,818) Early to mid- Historic Undetermined Bottling Plant Historic 19th C. Complex 09140.001508 Karner Habitat 1,039(3,409) Prehistoric Stray find Not Eligible Precontact Isolated Find#1 09140.001420 Marrin-Avenue of Pine 1,006(3,301) Early to mid- Historic Undetermined Historic sites(NYSM 19th C. 10659) 09140.01419 J. Marvin House and 1,099(3,606) mid-19 C. Historic Not Eligible associated sites (NYSM 10658) 09140.001558 Saratoga Regional 877(2,877) Prehistoric Isolated find Undetermined YMCA Prehistoric Isolated Find 09140.001585 Pitney Farm 2 936(3,071) Prehistoric Isolated find Undetermined Precontact Site 09140.001586 Pitney Farm Historic 1,014(3,327) Late 19 - Historic Undetermined Site 20t"C. 09140.001584 Pitney Farm 1 1,188(3,898) Prehistoric Isolated find Undetermined Precontact Site NYSM 4697(Sara 3) 49(161) Prehistoric Villa e NYSM 4698 (Sara 4) 238(781) Woodland Village NYSM 6907 1,266(4,154) Prehistoric Camps Twelve previously identified archaeological sites were found within a one-mile radius of the proposed project. Five of these are historic period sites. These sites reflect the rural, agricultural history of the area west of Saratoga Springs' earlier neighborhoods. The precontact (prehistoric) period sites include four documented occurrences of"stray" or isolated artifact finds. These sites were documented by modern cultural resource surveys and are confidently accepted as indications of broad, low-intensity Native American use of the local landscape for hunting, gathering, or camping during the period before contact with Europeans. Two other precontact period sites were described as village sites in the state-wide inventory of archaeological sites compiled by early 20t" century archaeologist Arthur C. Parker (1922). However, Parker's information is often imprecise, vague, or contradictory. As he himself noted, much of Parker's information was provided by informants and correspondents rather than his own surveys, and thus in a very real sense was second-hand information. Parker(1922:689) described Saratoga County (Sara) 3 (NYSM 4697) as a village site "near" Saratoga Springs. No information has been recovered subsequently to verify this Saratoga Springs report as a 2 precontact period village site in the vicinity of the current project site. As a result, this identification is somewhat doubtful from a present-day perspective. Saratoga County (Sara) 4 (NYSM 4698) is described as a village at the"Gravel hill" in Saratoga Springs. This location is obscure compared to present day landmarks, but may refer to a location east of Saratoga Springs. Its name ("Gravel hill") does not fit well with the soil types in the project vicinity as these are dominated by sand and loamy sand. This identification of a precontact village site in the project vicinity therefore also is doubtful. These two sites are the closest recoded precontact sites to the project APE, but for the reasons just mentioned, they are not considered to be reliable reports. The last of the previously recorded precontact period sites is NYSM 6907, described as camps and located nearly one mile away. NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES No sites listed in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) are identified in the near-vicinity of the project APE. Two historic districts identified in Table 3 are approximately �/4- 1/3 mile away. Table 3: National Re ister Sites NR# Description Address Distance m(ft) 90NR02850 Casino-Congress Park-Circular Roughly bounded by Spring and circular 497(1,631) street Historic District sts., park pl., and Broadwa 90NR02846 Saratoga Spa State Park District Vicinity of US Route 9 and New York 446(1,463) State Route 50 PREVIOUS ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH A large number of archaeological surveys have been conducted in Saratoga Springs. The following were conducted within �/4 mile of the project site: • Historical Archaeological Zoological Explorations— H.A.Z.Ex. 2018 Phase 1 Archaeological Sensitivity Assessment and Survey of the Stonequist Housing Expansion Project within the City of Saratoga Springs in Saratoga County, New York. • Powers Archaeology LLC 2016 Phase 1(IA and IB) Cultural Resource Investigations for the Proposed 176 South Broadway Hotel Project, Town of Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, New York. Neither of these archaeological surveys identified archaeological sites within their survey areas. HISTORIC MAP RESEARCH The following maps, ordered chronologically, were consulted to identify possible historic sites. Where possible, maps were georeferenced using GIS software. Historic map coverage is inclusive for the years 1779 to 1949. These maps are presented as figures in this report, illustrating historic occupation and land use. Some spatial distortions in the underlying historic maps may be apparent in comparison to the APE outline when georeferenced. Table 4: Historic Ma s Ma Date Reference Name/Other in PA 1779 A Chronological Map of the Province of New York, Claude none Joseph Sauthier(Fi ure 5) 3 Ma Date Reference Name/Other in PA 1829 Map of the County of Saratoga, David H. Burr(Fi ure 6) none 1866 Georeferenced Map of Saratoga Springs, Beers (Fi ure 7) none 1876 Georeferenced Map of Saratoga and Ballston with none Surroundings, Beers (Fi ure 8) 1879 Georeferenced Map of the town of Saratoga Springs, none Cramer& Mott(Fi ure 9) 1890 Georeferenced Map of Saratoga County, New York, Lant none and Silvernail (Fi ure 10) 1902 Georeferenced Saratoga USGS 15'minute quadrangle none Fi ure 11 1942 Georeferenced Saratoga USGS 15'minute quadrangle Two buildings (Figure 12) 1949 Georeferenced Saratoga USGS 15'minute quadrangle Th ree bu i Id i ngs (Fi ure 13) MAP DOCUMENTED STRUCTURES No structures are shown in or adjacent to the APE on historic maps until 1942-1949 (Figures 12 and 13). The sequence of maps dated 1866-1879 shows the progression of development in the vicinity of the project site from open, undeveloped terrain in 1866 to inclusion in the growing Saratoga Springs street plan in 1876 and 1879, at least as it was envisioned for this area (Figures 7-9). Ballston Avenue is shown on the 1866 map, but the closest structure is the J. Finley house well to the south. A street grid was at least planned in this area by 1876- 1879, as shown on those maps, although the map convention apparently was not to show most buildings within the urban street grid. Later maps, however, indicate that the settlement of this part of the city was slow to develop. The 1890 Lant and Silvernail map is associated with a directory of farmsteads; none are shown in this area. The 1902 USGS 15' quad is not restricted to farmsteads, but similarly, it shows no buildings in this area. Importantly, neither of these maps how the side streets depicted on the 1870s maps, suggesting that these earlier depictions show paper streets. Since the two later maps are in agreement, it is assumed that they are accurate, the side streets in the area (such as Finley)were not yet constructed ca. 1890-1902, and the project location was on the edge of the urban part of Saratoga Springs at the turn of the 2pt" century. The first buildings in the APE appear to have been built in the time between publication of the 1902 and 1942 maps. The 1942 USGS 15' quad shows a structure in each of the corners of the APE fronting on Ballston Avenue, while the structure behind the 116 Ballston Avenue front building is not shown on this map. The 1949 map provides the same depiction with the addition of the structure behind the front (corner) 116 Ballston Avenue building (the address of both buildings is 116 Ballston Avenue). Photos of the extant buildings are provided in this report. PRIOR DISTURBANCE Prior disturbances within the APE include the construction of the residential and commercial structures, the parking lots, and the landscaping along Ballston Avenue. This has generally involved cutting and leveling. This is particularly obvious when comparing the ground level of the undeveloped wooded area between the buildings at 96 and 116 Ballston Avenue to the adjoining parking lots, street-side, and mapped alley space behind these lots (alley spaces were designed public spaces used for service support at the backs of private properties; Corbett 2001). The differences the disturbed and undisturbed landscapes are visible in various of the photographs in Appendix B. The historic map data reviewed suggests that this wooded area has never been developed, and its core appears not to have been cut down, although its surface is marked with several wide, shallow pits (that are much smaller than cellar holes-- these may have been for borrowing sand or perhaps were dug as forts for children's play). 4 ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY The project site is within an area of precontact period archaeological sensitivity. It is particularly sensitive for the occurrence of small precontact period camps and activity areas where small numbers of precontact artifacts may occur. The project site is not considered sensitive for the occurrence of historic period archaeological sites predating the 20t" century. Evidence of early to middle 20t" century artifacts may occur, as indicated by the historic map data. PHASE 'IA SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS A complete and comprehensive Phase 1 A archaeological survey has been conducted. Much of the project site has been disturbed by prior construction, although areas that do not appear to be substantially disturbed also occur. The project site is considered sensitive for the occurrence of small precontact period camp or activity sites. The historic period sensitivity is limited to the 20th century. As a result of these findings, a Phase 1 B archaeological survey is recommended for the undisturbed portions of the project site. PHASE 1 B ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD INVESTIGATIONS The Phase 1 B field survey was conducted in sunny dry weather on December 6, 2018. The survey transects were laid out by the principal investigator within the APE. Transects 1 was placed along the north side of the APE farthest from the obvious disturbance to the knoll visible along the parking lot. It was set back from the street in accordance with disturbance from the street area eastward to a point where topography suggested a lack of prior disturbance. Transect 2 was set up 15 m (50 feet) south of Transect 1, avoiding the parking lot. Transect 3-5 were set up on the wooded knoll avoiding the parking lots cut banks, and steep slopes on both sides. Transect 5-7 also avoided a cut bank on the east side of the knoll adjacent to the alley space. These Transects were 15 m (50 ft) apart, except for STP 4/1, where a 7.5 m (25 ft) interval to Transect 3 was used to avoid a cut area associated with the 116 Ballston Ave. parking lot. Transects 6 and 7 were set up 15 and 30 m (50 and 100 ft) south of Transect 5 in the potentially undisturbed areas behind the 116 Ballston Ave. back structure. STPs 2/1, 7/1, and 8/1 were placed in locations to confirm apparent prior disturbance. The shovel testing was conducted by the principal investigator and assistant archaeologist. The Phase 1 B field methodology was guided by Section 2.3 of the New York Archaeological Council Standards (NYAC 1994), as well as guidelines provided by the New York State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO 2005). All soils were screened through �/4-inch mesh hardware cloth. Following the completion of fieldwork, all field data were brought to the Curtin Archaeology office and lab for processing and analysis. PHASE 1 B ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY RESULTS Shovel Testing A total of 23 STPs was deployed as summarized in Table 1. The STP locations are shown on Figure 14. The shovel test pit records are presented in Appendix C. 5 Table 5: Phase 1 B STP Summary STPs n- 7.5-15m 23 no di s 0 Total 23 Soil Stratigraphy The soil stratigraphy showed several patterns indicating either little or no prior disturbance or extensive prior disturbance, depending upon location. Apparently undisturbed soil profiles were found on the knoll, usually well away from its edges at STPs 3/2, 4/1, 4/3, 4/4, and 5/1. These soils profiles had A-B sequences with a dark to medium brown loamy fine sand over yellow brown to dark yellow brown loamy fine sand. Traces of gravel occurred frequently. An apparent variation of this appeared at STP 1/1 on the northern edge of the APE in a reasonably expected location, although this pattern was not repeated along Transect 1. Here, at STP 1/1, redeposited soil appears to have differentiated into an A-B sequence above an intact A-B sequence. Elsewhere varying evidence of disturbance occurred on the knoll, around its edges, and in more level terrain beyond the elevation. Two main patterns are evident in the stratigraphic data. In one of these there is mixed A and B soil in a transition between the present-day A horizon and the remnant of the original B. In these cases, the present-day A soil is considered to have been redeposited (or perhaps only recently formed) as it caps a mixed, disturbed soil. The B horizon is considered to have been truncated by prior disturbance. This pattern occurs at STPs 4/2, 5/2, 6/2, 7/2, 7/3, and 8/1. Except for STP 8/1, which was placed just south of the 96 Ballston Ave. structure to confirm apparent prior disturbance, this type of evidence clusters in several adjacent STPs in the southeast section of the APE. The other pattern is one in which there is no present-day A horizon and mixed soil lies directly on top of the B. This also is considered to indicate redeposited soil on top of a truncated B horizon. This pattern clusters spatially on the knoll near the 96 Ballston Ave parking lot and extends south to STP 4/2. The landscape is marked by shallow pits near these STPs. Another apparent indication of prior disturbance includes rocky soil at STP 2/1 as well as at STP 1/2 where a rock impasse was encountered. It seems possible that the rocks are part of deeper stratigraphy that could occur below the sandy horizons, and so they are consistent with topographic evidence that the upper stratigraphy was removed in these locations. A fill deposit contain cinder and slag was found at STP 1/3. It overlay the B horizon where cinder, slag and charcoal extended into the subsoil. Artifacts No precontact period artifacts were found. A small assemblage of 35 historic period artifacts was recovered. They occurred in low density in numerous of the shovel test pits and appear to represent miscellaneous trash that accumulated in these locations over time. None of these artifacts are considered indicative of the early settlement of Saratoga Springs during the late 18t"-early 19t" century. This assemblage includes items such as salt-glazed stoneware with interior Albany Slip, whiteware, ironstone, vessel glass, flat(window) glass, wire nails, and other miscellaneous items. Most of the artifacts that can be associated with manufacture ranges provide terminus post quem(TPQ) ages of post-1840, post-1850, or post-1905. While we use a date of post-1850 for wire nails, they rarely if ever were available in the northeastern United States that early and are generally considered to be 20t" century artifacts. Some artifact classes with long manufacture ranges such as whiteware (1820-present) and Albany Slipped salt-glazed stoneware (1805-1920) have age ranges that are entirely consistent with being contemporary with the other dated items in the assemblage, and with the documented 20t" century history of the APE. 6 PHASE 1B FIELD SURVEY SUMMARYAND RECOMMENDATION A complete and comprehensive Phase 1 B archaeological survey has been conducted. Areas identified as previously disturbed based upon analysis of topographic maps, the built environment, and the locations of cut banks were not shovel tested, but visual evidence of prior disturbance was photo-documented (Appendix B). The Phase 1 B shovel testing program resulted in the excavation of 23 shovel test pits in areas that appeared to be potentially undisturbed or where confirmation of prior disturbance was sought. Additional evidence of prior disturbance was encountered, as well as an undisturbed area generally associated with a core location of the wooded knoll. This archaeological survey has found no evidence of archaeological sites indicated by archaeological features or concentrations of artifacts in undisturbed areas. The artifact assemblage recovered is small and consistent with the map-documented 20t" century history of the project site. As a result, no additional archaeological investigation is recommended. 7 REFERENCES Corbett, Theodore 2001 The Making of American Resorts: Saratoga Springs, Ballston Spa, Lake George. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, New Jersey. De Lau benfels, David J. 1977 Vegetation. In Geography of New York State, John H. Thompson, editor. Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York. New York Archaeological Council (NYAC) 1994 Standards for Cultural Resource Investigations and the Curation of Archaeological Collections in New York State. http://nyarchaeology.org/assests/standards/ NYACStandards.pdf New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (SHPO) 2005 Phase I Archaeological Report Format Requirements. http://nysparks.com/shpo/ environmental-review/documents/Phasel ReportStandards.pdf Parker, Arthur C. 1922 The Archeological History of New York. New York State Museum Bulletins 235-238, Albany. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 1992 Soil Survey of Saratoga County, New York. 8 APPENDIX A: FIGURES 9 .�� , � � � � � ' � # -�` �,� � � � � � � .�� � � �� � � � � * � � 4 � + � r � ~� - �• , ; � � , � ����' ~ *,� �� , �� # ��� � t ' � � . �� � � . �'.�. �F ��� � � . � � � � .� � � � .��� � �' � � � -'� . � �� �� r � -� � ��e� ���� ��� � �� .�, -� � �i � ��� �� � '"��, .. � � ��, � �� ' � �� ���`'" ` � . .� � �� . � r. ��.'� � � � � � �� - � � � . � ��;. .�� ,� � . ,. . *� � ������ ��_��j � � � +� � � � � �.�� � � * �_ � � �� ��������. � � �' . ���,����� � �`���� �,�. �� : , � ., ..�.��.�a� ���ti�� � � : �+� ���������� ����������� �: �� .- - .� ��..S �* . � .. ,�.��, � . . _y�� .. ��. . � 74���� � �' � '��� � �� ' �`'���� � � �k��._ ' � ��8 �� �� �`�,,� ° �����,����`} � �� .- ����.���� � . -- '3 � F , ..������ . � ������•_ ��!! � 1� ����J�l� ��t a���i ��� ' " ; '�.�q�' � —+��.-+r�Y�4 •�+f.�:•� ' � � � ��� �� . �. ��� ' � '��!����3#.��� r�"'�', r.. r �� . ��� � ��t �'�"-� . � �. ��� �� � ��:�� .�.�'T� i � , � � � � � � �• ��.�������,, � " � J � � � �r, ������' ���I�� � � �_ �, �r � ^� �� � �� i�. � �� ����.��� � � � � � � ��� . � ��� � � — � � �� � 4 � �J , !� � �. ��R ���.* 'w �'_�i� �� � � w � ��� � �� ��� � # # ���:� : .a � �� � � -� _ � _ � - �-� � l � ��� �.�' � , � ��� *�� r '� � � � ��� ,� � . y • � � � �� � � �� � q � I � � � ° � � �� � ` � � � � ��� � � � ■ � �� � . . ., �+ , , r- - .- _ ..�� � .. 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'i ' .'• e as f y. - ;° :.r ,y e ' ,� now R - m _ z, Y , • f • • r , � all ti. w ,l,.y;k , i■ all.,• 1 a F aY Y - .T F w ` a a r ... r' ,Y hf R. 10 tE � _ `� a �, F � � • _. �� - rALr rWA am �r rI IF s y t _ r 1 rmw�, - w �7 if Nq r, 1 dr ■ ' 0' r r Figure 3• Mapped soil units Q APE Soil units 10 0 10 20 30 40 m tof OIC of AS------ F e� 06 Ad 46 4r Ap AL 4ft I I IF 4L 4s JF Ilk. Figure 4: 2017 Orthoirnagery showing existing conditions APE IL 'OF Ie i, j —P l r r 12 re � PLL _ e , , + y• r ........... ................... - ! � a �. Jk �,, • 7 ter'• - _ + i f • neve. ... ti k+ _ - ]ice 4,p •s W N�•y�fv �„a,,._r. _m 4 a • r _ n verl,veYv+ + v ' i Kf 5 It --------------- + i r OeF ' :� . 4 °e+,msµ, r4 • :�. +.Y �l ���`' � '•��� i+ -_v wSeM+u.�ii N XI IYYTY .Irl.. Nil aff tx JA ` - � r �� 11 r.a.+iC•. �� • {' i. x,_ � T `5+-..wr�Y.r.wYw+Y�.aa * c .e+ .. � i � •'SSE 1 f' - Y y I�. 1"TA L J ��'— �— � "•. _- • , I 5+r VvlsvYY—aaiiae . un kY+a vvaa,ev v,, +a r 1�. Y•9y-- �' � •' AL T ia, � - f T���•�k4� - Y y v+ L � Tia r n fj Figure 6: 1829 Map of the county of Saratoga by David H. Burr 0 Project Vicinity 250 0 250 500 750 1000 m 4 Y lop a Io IF y - , N16,y: oil t AP - d qP 't,i .•.`� now lab A 14 Ir it's 9 r • N jA- IL in �. _. we Cese y Figure 7: Georeferenced 1866 Map of Saratoga Springs by Beers 0 APE 250 0 250 500 750 1000 r r6 ILI �17-- .014 Ire r —� —OIL —_ o - _CIO,p g vt P IP Ik� ti �f rj f t 1 stip Figure 8: Georeferenced 1876 Map of Saratoga and Ballston with surroundings by Beers 0 APE 250 0 250 500 750 1000 m 41, Jt dpq- tiF IL Ir A `= ' � , da " alai IL 15 411- L, FA Amami— qP 0 Ar w SIR fi S rt #Ad'. it IL U. e it �- m E Ipkr ,.1. ' L c _ _ f lop AVS r a 'kms r jo � r Nib 4 or - _ . ZV' 4T Iqw 1.4.1 i+6 ,` +r ._0 CO4 .tea j —. E JL Ci K 73 Dill ,'" ' 0 a 61 so Q A w. � ' I r Figure 9: Georeferenced 1879 Map of the village of Saratoga by Cramer and Mott 0 APE 250 0 250 500 750 1000 _ F � 1 ■ ■ ■S e f 1 IT ■ ■ L Ae —r i ■ i ■ L ■ T T S i, r' J ■ .. L �}� ■ mi ■� IN r s ■ r r�"� _ F AN. i IN ■ ` a Y� IN q ■ _ pip NIP IL IP a INS IF II FE rm SON 1 t L rf. • ■ ■ iF . ■ , P r a ■ T T 4 ■7 � ■ s r,. L _ IN 1� L _ J t - !■ J ■ INt ■ t r i LY ■ J� � ` ■ • r 1 i ■ Air E - F Y w No. ■IN t L ■ * L + NIN 4 YF ■ ■ U. Ir IN F + $■_ I ■ IN _ ■ ■ s 1 r ■ Re F' ■r00 IN m i F 11`6 y ■ia + F�iF ■ ■ ■ a u IY s ■* 1 ■ IrIF IN WIN s ■ IN i YF +� ■ y RON IF n, w III IN L Is ■ ■ T ` 1 IL i i � ■ t * � ■ i � � '� a � ■ � ■ F t ■ � .. i.. ■ ■ * Yi.. ■ IN IN 0 oil RON 04 ■ ' ■1■ i■s ■' ■ ! ■ i■ 7 �"■ T ivy a, F * ■- i ■ ■ % LA ■ t i F F 1 T . 1 +■ ■ b ''_ ■ F ti IN YY! l i Milk i ■ iNOY Eta e q I rm I' Is •�" ' T • ■ . L 1 is I 1 - Y - ■ A NIS Ni IF INA T. Figure 10: Georeferenced 1890 Map of Saratoga county, New York by Lant and Silvernail 0 APE 250 0 250 500 750 1000 m U. 6 .' NO a d d R o Figure 11: Georeferenced 1902 Saratoga USGS 15' minute quadrangle APE 250 0 250 500 750 1000 m 1 Y `d ■ E er y _ L 1 o �.J"p JF z . - N. k 1 . SO 00 - r i ■ IMI, I � _ LE AIL USE - W. 40 1 — ,r r a~ dr WEN IS, w WAS. all '9 kz� 4r ZZ ^ z 41 � i � k } %ter 1 e ' � +. _ - { _"� ■ *moi � � :. it v MOT 96 L ri �i� a SIP, w •°, MIEW hp At TII �• r 1 ' 1 P I} + _ .rte. I IF — Rj CLjo R 7: — a MjMr '� -v t, -1I 41 oil ' s a � • ■ . " S a o y p I ■ 26 IL IUL Op ■ Figure 12: Georeferenced 1942 Saratoga USGS 15' minute quadrangle 0 APE V Or Mir Ar - - a Figure 13: Georeferenced 1949 Saratoga USGS 15' minute quadrangle 0 APE 10 0 10 20 30 40 m �►.�Arii.I►w�►.w.� p ._ €�a Figure 14: Archaeological testing with photo angles Transect -> Negative STP ■ Historic Positive STP APPENDIX B: PHOTOS 24 r r 1 vow .4 .`7 TF.y I• 3 � ■ r } Irkjw n r 1p i _ + _jam- � '"�'. � - .�. ,I �y t.. F, —. a _ F"- ,i --+'•• i°' e , J ys ,4 ' '' "°F- .�. -•�, 7 jar �, �•:" -' q •, .• ,'� �S•�a: '�.-., `� � " t ., ,,.°7�yY. .. _ rry .. .., x a£' ^ r �_�n fr n�3�,a ' 9: �y-+. �-�, ��,qL �'•df� 9 Allk - r a - 4, dO _ Tam r 1 ' • r _ IET Jr IF F, . 1§•i' ,wp. ., 4+. R M •�•#� ;{P�"y. '^� . I 1 r aFP Ir J • x. aim'- -• i ;�'' � • ,I 'r Pi , r �.. L , �, � ,� t y_ •, ' ' � � • 1 as l e� r ' - , d t .. 'ti. S ar 4, - q ,� � - '° , i yid" � •4 � � L'' I �' .r F' � 4 r / a e? , .. ! r a 5 � 4 x j2 `7 � • •. Jar - •. • +' 7i�._If" _-# ice; r SPA J-T�, ri���r r �_ � - � _ - -. - •� � _ . j_ LL., _ fir` er�l_ ._. - ���. rT' ,�arR �1 ,e _ ���L moi•- �� � � : �..•� } � ,. ., IMP g� x Y ��� �-.•- — ,.� .. - _ .. a •�� ; - ,e �. ,per , s air Ar If � _.. �+ •._ � +r ' - -" ., _ , `�' ' �t.#. +�' ,r A e ,yam .L � � _ �. _ r�q : fro'qL Photo 5: View looking north/northeast at the cut bank bordering the 116 Ballston Avenue parking lot. The parking lot and adjoinin area have been disturbed in the removal of this part of the knoll. *TYf$ e I • ae c a a � ; Y 1 Photo 6: View looking north/northeast at the cut bank bordering the alley space east of Transects 5, 63 and 7. 'c + F Photo 9: View looking east at the back building at 116 Ballston Avenue. The garage to the left is attached to the front building. Photo 10: A closer view of the back building at 116 Ballston Avenue, looking northeast. APPENDIX C: SHOVEL TEST PIT RECORD 30 Ballston Ave Townhouses Phase 1 B Shovel Test Pit Records STP Depth Soil Description +/- Comment 01/01 0-13 dk br to fi sa D charcoal, modern garbage 01/01 13-31 It br mott dk br/ ye br to fi sa D charcoal 01/01 31-42 dk br to fi sa D Buried , charcoal, roof slate 01/01 42-53 ye br to fi sa H metal object 01/02 0-18 dk br to fi sa H 1 glass 01/02 18-30 ye br sa ncm rock impasse, bioturbation evident 01/03 0-15 dk br gry to si D, H Discard: charcoal plastic, cinder, slag; H: glass 01/03 15-48 dk br gy gry ashy sa D, H Discard: charcoal, cinders, slag; H: 2 glass 01/03 48-58 and ye br to fi sa D Discard: charcoal, cinder, slag 02/01 0-16 dk br rocky gry sa to ncm 02/01 16-36 dk ye br v. rocky gry sa to D Discard: slate roof tile frag 02/02 0-36 and br humic to fi sa D Discard: 1 Styrofoam cup frag, 1 candy wrapper 02/02 36-55 ye br to fi sa ncm tr gry 03/01 0-18 It br / mott dk br to fi sa H, D glass, Discard: charcoal- tr gry 03/01 18-60 dk ye br to fi sa H glass 03/02 0-23 dk br to fi sa D charcoal 03/02 23-45 dk ye br to fi sa ncm 03/03 0-15 and br/ dk gy br mixed to fi sa ncm 03/03 15-36 and ye br to fi sa ncm 03/04 0-12 dk br mott gy br/gy to fi sa H glass 03/04 12-43 and ye br to fi sa ncm 03/05 0-18 mixed dk br/ dk ye br to fi sa H glass 03/05 18-20 dk ye br to fi sa ncm root impasse 04/01 0-26 dk br to fi sa H ceramic and glass 04/01 26-41 dk ye br to fi sa ncm 04/02 0-12 It br to fi sa H glass 04/02 12-22 mixed dk br/ ye br to fi sa ncm 04/02 22-33 dk br to fi sa ncm Buried A?, root impasse 04/03 0-16 dk br to fi sa ncm 04/03 16-41 dk ye br to fi sa ncm 04/04 0-22 dk br to fi sa ncm 04/04 22-34 dk ye br to fi sa ncm 04/05 0-07 and ye br to fi sa ncm 04/05 07-27 mixed br/ dk br to fi sa ncm 04/05 27-45 and ye br to fi sa H ceramic 05/01 0-17 dk br to fi sa ncm tr gry 05/01 17-50 ye br to fi sa ncm tr gry 05/02 0-16 dk br to fi sa H 2 Clear bottle glass- tr gry 05/02 16-42 mixed ye br/ dk br to fi sa ncm tr gry 05/02 42-58 ye br to fi sa ncm tr gry 06/01 0-12 and br to fi sa ncm tr gry 06/01 12-27 dk br to fi sa D Discard: brick, flat glass, wire nail frags- tr gry 06/01 27-48 gy ye br to fi sa ncm tr gry 06/02 0-12 dk br to fi sa D Discard: plastic -tr gry 06/02 12-17 mixed dk ye br/ dk br to fi sa ncm tr gry 06/02 17-27 v dk br to fi sa D Discard: plastic- tr gry 06/02 27-40 ye br to fi sa D Discard: asphalt- tr grv, asphalt impasse 07/01 0-14 dk br to fi sa D Discard: 1 clear bottle glass, tr gry 07/01 14-19 ye br to fi sa ncm tr grv, root impasse Ballston Ave Townhouses Phase 1 B Shovel Test Pit Records STP Depth Soil Description +/- Comment 07/02 0-16 dk br to fi sa H, D 2 Bottle glass, 2 nails; Discard: 2 plastic- tr gry 07/02 16-26 mixed ye br/ dk br to fi sa ncm tr gry 07/02 26-45 gy ye br to fi sa ncm tr gry 07/03 0-11 dk br to fi sa D Discard: flagging tape, foil -tr gry 07/03 11-33 mixed dk ye br/ dk br to fi sa ncm tr grv, root impasse 08/01 0-20 dk br to fi sa ncm 08/01 20-35 mixed ye br/ dk br to fi sa H, D 1 whiteware and other; Discard: 1 coal -Tr gry 08/01 35-75 gy ye br sa D 1 brick frag @ interface, tr gry APPENDIX D: ARTIFACT CATALOG 33 Ballston Ave Townhouses Phase 1 B Artifact Catalog FS Phase Tran STP Stratum Material Count Weight Artifact Function Date 1.011 1 1 1 4 Metal 001 21.1 Compound metal piece unaffiliated 1.012 1 1 2 1 Glass 0011 0.6 decorative glass unaffiliated 1.008 1 1 3 1 Glass 002 1 Vessel glass unaffiliated 1.008 1 1 3 1 Glass 001 0.2 decorative glass unaffiliated 1.008 1 1 3 1 Glass 001 1.3 Vessel glass unaffiliated 1.010 1 1 3 2 Glass 001 2.7 Flat glass architectural 1.010 1 1 3 2 Glass 001 2.2 Vessel glass food related 1.010 1 1 3 2 Other 001 0.5 Coal unaffiliated 1.009 1 3 1 1 Glass 002 1.5 Vessel glass food related 1.014 1 3 1 2 Glass 002 3 Vessel glass unaffiliated 1.014 1 3 1 2 Ceramic 001 2.6 Refined Earthenware unaffiliated post 1840 1.013 1 3 3 2 Glass 001 1.5 Vessel glass unaffiliated 1.013 1 3 3 2 Glass 001 2.8 Flat glass architectural 1.013 1 3 3 2 Glass 001 8.6 Vessel glass food related 1.015 1 3 4 1 Glass 001 0.6 Vessel glass unaffiliated 1.006 1 3 5 1 Glass 001 3 Vessel glass food related 1.003 1 4 1 1 Ceramic 001 133.8 Refined Earthenware food related 1805-1920 1.003 1 4 1 1 Glass 001 0.3 Vessel glass food related 1.007 1 4 2 1 Glass 001 1.9 Vessel glass food related 1.007 1 4 2 1 Glass 0031 23.4 Vessel glass food related post 1905 1.005 1 4 5 2 Ceramic 001 1.2 Refined Earthenware food related post 1820 1.004 1 5 2 1 Glass 002 7 Vessel glass food related 1.001 1 7 2 1 Glass 001 2.5 Vessel glass food related 1.001 1 7 2 1 Metal 002 2.2 Wire nail architectural post 1850 1.001 1 7 2 1 Glass 001 18.2 Vessel glass food related post 1905 1.002 1 8 1 2 Ceramic 001 0.4 Coarse Earthenware unaffiliated 1.002 1 8 1 2 Other 001 0.3 Tack, unidentified unaffiliated 11.002 1 8 11 12 ICeramic 001 0.6 Refined Earthenware Ifood related post 1820 Ballston Ave Townhouses Phase 1 B Artifact Catalog FS C Ware C Decor G Color G Color 1.011 cuprous metal object with plastic inside of a piece with a small hole through it and a ferrous screw in the side 1.012 colorless small fragment 1.008 colorless 1.008 colorless small fragment 1.008 aqua 1.010 1.010 1.010 1.009 colorless 1.014 colorless 1.014 ironstone undecorated 1.013 amber 1.013 aqua 1.013 colorless embossed, "...YES/ ... ADOW/ ... M" 1.015 colorless 1.006 colorless 1.003 salt glazed stoneware Albany slip written "... YMOU... " 1.003 amber 1.007 colorless 1.007 colorless seam goes to the lip, metal on glass 1.005 whiteware undecorated 1.004 colorless 1.001 modern green 1.001 1.001 partial suction scar and ghost seam 1.002 redware undecorated 1.002 metal with white top cover 1.002 whiteware undecorated possible scalloped edge